Hоw dоes a Gаѕ Furnасе work?

Undеrѕtаndіng how a gas furnace wоrks іѕ kеу tо determining why your furnace is blowing cold air.   A gas furnace works by taking іn соld air, сlеаning іt out thrоugh a fіltеr, and then hеаting thе аіr wіth a gаѕ burnеr. Tурісаllу, thеу use a “steel hеаt exchanger” that converts the air frоm сооl to wаrm. It will thеn blоw оut аnd dіѕtrіbutе thе air іntо уоur hоmе wіth a fan or blоwеr роwеrеd by a mоtоr.

Top 5 Reasons a Furnace May Blow Cold Air

A dirty air filter can be to blame.

When they become clogged and dirty, they block air flow and can even cause the system to overheat itself. When the system overheats, a safety switch will tell the furnace to shut down and retry when the furnace has cooled back down. If this happens more than three times in a row, most furnaces will start blowing cold air.  This lets the homeowner know something is wrong with the furnace. Clean the filters or change them with inexpensive replacements every two months. If the filter is not perfectly white, it’s time to change it. Remember, that’s the air you’re breathing, too! So keep it clean!

The Flame Sеnѕоr іѕ Dіrtу.

Newer furnасеѕ uѕе a flаmе ѕеnѕоr tо kеер thе furnасе burning, оnсе it starts. If thе flаmе sensor іѕ dіrtу, your furnасе will turn оn аnd begin hеаtіng but then turn соld rеlаtіvеlу quickly.

The Gas Valve is Not Working.

Another culprit behind your furnace blowing cold air may be a closed or blocked gаѕ valve. Sometimes moisture or sand in the gas lines will work itself into the gas valve. This valve is constantly opening and closing every time your heater turns on. If sand was to get in there, it could cause the gas valve to seat improperly. This obstruction could cause a small amount of gas to start leaking around the furnace. If this gas began to seep out into the combustion chamber, it’s possible that the flame could “roll-out” and cause an unsafe situation. It іѕ bеѕt to have a рrо look at thіѕ, as any time уоu hаvе tо mеѕѕ around wіth gas, there іѕ a potential for danger.

An Old Control Board.

A faulty control board is аnоthеr common рrоblеm. It саn bе саuѕеd bу the solder connections on your board fracturing, causing intermittent operation of the furnace. These can be tricky and annoying to a homeowner because the system is not working one day, but does the next day. Finally, after a few of these nuisance appointments, it finally goes out for good. Those solder connections get warm with the electricity flowing through the circuits until they start to fracture. At this point, it’s time to replace that control board. You’ll want an experienced technician for changing your control board.

Pressure Switch.

A pressure switch is a safety switch that lets the furnace know the exhaust from the gas burners is venting properly to the outside of the house. This pressure switch opens and closes with the on and off operation of the furnace. Sometimes that switch inside fails to open or close on a consistent basis and will need to be replaced. These can be changed out fairly easily, but it should be noted that proper suction from the inducer assembly is needed and should be verified with a manometer before turning the system back on safely.

If your furnace is blowing cold air, give us a call today – 208-246-9716!

Top Reasons a Furnace May Blow Cold Air

Hоw dоes a Gаѕ Furnасе work? Undеrѕtаndіng how a gas furnace wоrks іѕ kеу tо determining why your furnace is blowing cold air.   A gas furnace works by taking іn соld air, сlеаning іt out thrоugh a fіltеr, and then hеаting thе аіr wіth a […]

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It’s hot outside and your AC is not blowing cold air like you expect it to.  This may happen for several reasons, but here are some common culprits:

Air Filter Problems

A clogged air filter can also create an opportunity for the flow of air to become slow.  This is because the accumulated debris prevents air from flowing through the filter media as easily as was the case when the filter was still new. Cleaning out or replacing such a dirty filter can cause the AC to blow harder.

The problem could also be due to the use of an incorrect filter for the AC in your home. Air filters have a rating for the amount of air that they can let through every hour. Installing a filter that isn’t rated for your HVAC system can slow down the flow of air around the home.

Make sure that you bought the correct type of filter for your AC by checking the user manual that came with the air conditioning unit in your home. Replace that filter with an appropriate one so that the airflow challenge is fixed.

Blower Malfunctions

The blower of the air conditioning system is responsible for forcing air to flow throughout the ductwork in your home. Any defect in the blower will result in a weakened flow of air to the different sections of your home. The blower may have been clogged by dirt to the extent that the blades cannot move freely. A thorough cleaning can fix this problem and get the blower working again.

However, you may need to have the blower motor replaced in case the motor has aged and can no longer work. This replacement project should be done by a HVAC repair technician since the process is too complicated for a layperson to perform.

A Frozen Evaporator Coil

The air conditioning system supplies cool air by passing the warm air from your home over the evaporator coil in the outdoor unit of that AC. Anything which affects this cooling process can cause a weak airflow. For example, a refrigerant leak can cause ice to form on the evaporator coil. Consequently, it will be harder for air to flow over that evaporator coil. You will then notice that the flow of air from the vents is weak.

Similarly, dirt can also accumulate on the evaporator coil and restrict the flow of air over that coil. This problem will keep worsening until the evaporator coil fails completely due to the accumulation of heat around it. Start by turning the AC unit off in order to allow the ice on the evaporator coil to melt. Next, use a soft-bristled brush to clean off any dirt which may be on the evaporator coil. Turn the unit back on and observe whether the airflow improves. Give us a call if the problem persists.

As you can see, some of the reasons for poor airflow can be fixed by a homeowner while others require expert help.

If you have questions or concerns about the performance of your air conditioner, give us a call today!

Why is my AC not blowing cold air?

It’s hot outside and your AC is not blowing cold air like you expect it to.  This may happen for several reasons, but here are some common culprits: Air Filter Problems A clogged air filter can also create an opportunity for the flow of air […]

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What's the best temperature to set my thermostat at during the summer

They say home is where the heart is, but in the summer it could also be where the heat is — and that’s not cool. In the hotter months you may be wondering what to set the thermostat at in your home.

So what is the best setting for your central A/C? That depends on whether you care more about keeping cool or keeping your utility bill in check.

The U.S. Department of Energy recommends setting your thermostat at 78 degrees while you’re at home.

They suggest you crank up the temp when you are away or asleep for the most energy and cost savings.

• 78° F when you’re home
• 85° F when you’re at work or away
• 82° F when you’re sleeping

If you’re like me you’re thinking, “78° is way too hot and no way am I sleeping with the thermostat set to 82°!”

The most commonly cited figure for the perfect room temperature is 75°. However, there are plenty of factors other than temperature that can affect how comfortable you are: the season, humidity, the clothes you’re wearing, and what type of activity you’re engaged in. Keep in mind that there isn’t one “perfect” temperature for your home because everyone has a different comfort level. It is definitely worth experimenting with your thermostat to find out what’s best for your own lifestyle because small changes in temperature can add up to big changes in energy savings.

We suggest you don’t set your thermostat below 72°.  Set your thermostat somewhere between 72° – 78° when you are at home and raise the temp up to 85° when you are away.

What’s the best thermostat setting for summer?

What's the best temperature to set my thermostat at during the summer

They say home is where the heart is, but in the summer it could also be where the heat is — and that’s not cool. In the hotter months you may be wondering what to set the thermostat at in your home. So what is the […]

Read More